Dr. Mark T. Reynolds

Research Scientist
University of Michigan Department of Astronomy,
306G West Hall,
1085 S. University Ave.,
Ann Arbor,
MI 48109,
USA.

Email: markrey**at**umich**dot**edu
Phone: +1 734 764 4160
Fax: +1 734 763 6317

                                      




My CV



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RX J1131-1231: A Rapidly Spinning Gravitationally Lensed Quasar at z=0.658


RX
     J1131-1231

Multiple images of a distant quasar are visible in this combined view from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope. The Chandra data were used to directly measure the spin of the supermassive black hole powering this quasar (a* > 0.66, 5σ confidence level). Mouseover to show the position of the quasar images and the lensing galaxy. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ of Michigan/R.C.Reis et al; Optical: NASA/STScI.

If you would like to know more, please find the full article here: Reflection from the Strong Gravity Regime in a Lensed Quasar at Redshift z=0.658 (Reis et al., 2014, Nature, 507, 207).




G306.3-0.9: A New ~ 2500 yr old supernova remnant


Left: This composite of supernova remnant G306.3–0.9 merges Chandra X-ray observations (blue), infrared data acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope (red and cyan) and radio observations (purple) from the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The image is 20 arcminutes across, which corresponds to 150 light-years at the remnant's estimated distance (8 kpc). Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Michigan/M. Reynolds et al; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: CSIRO/ATNF/ATCA. (Large version 10 MB)

Right: A wider view places G306.3–0.9 in context with star-formation regions in southern Centaurus. Chandra X-ray observations (blue), Spitzer infrared data (red, cyan), and radio observations (purple) from the Australia Telescope Compact Array are merged in this composite. The image is one degree across, which corresponds to 450 light-years at the remnant's estimated distance. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Michigan/M. Reynolds et al; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: CSIRO/ATNF/ATCA. (Large version 36 MB)

If you would like to know more, please find the full article here: G306.3-0.9: A newly discovered young galactic supernova remnant (Reynolds et al., 2013, ApJ, 766, 112).
See here for an image with the individual multi-wavelength eposures.




I am an assitant research scientist here at the University of Michigan, working primarily in the area of accretion physics. Typicaly, this involves multi-wavelength studies from X-ray/UV/optical/NIR/radio photometric and spectroscopic observations of stellar mass black holes and neutron stars in binary systems. Of course, candidate systems must be found first and this is done primarily through X-ray observations of these systems in outburst, see the research link above if you would like to learn more.

If you've any queries please don't hesitate to contact me!

Research Interests

  • Using black holes and neutron stars to test GR in the strong field limit
  • Using neutron stars to constrain the equation of state of ultradense matter
  • The physics of accreting black holes, neutron stars & white dwarfs, mass determinations, population studies
  • Accretion physics, Disk-Jet connections in accreting systems, LMXB - MSP link
  • Extragalactic X-ray binaries, supermassive black holes, SNe, GRBs
  • Relativistic astrophysics
  • .............to be continued.


Other stuff you should click!

Extreme Astrophysics in Michigan
The who/where/what of extreme astrophysics here at the University of Michigan.
Astronomical Picture Of the Day --- aka APOD
The amazing beauty of the cosmos plus the odd pearl of wisdom.
HEASARC picture of the week
High energy wonders!
Random stuff
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Kitt peak clear sky chart





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